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Rainford Goby

DYIguy

NJRC Member
I have a tailspot in one tank- strictly an algae eater. I thought ( from initial research ) that Rainford's were too- found out after I bought one that they actually just eat pods. The tank it's in was cycled with rock from another tank of mine and with fresh aragonite substrate. I'm not sure about what kind of pod population I have- I ordered some ( 3,000+) I have a chamber in my sump with a light and algae now- going to switch over to chaeto by the end of the week- Question is, once I add the pods will I have to add more on a regular basis- no other pod eaters in tank will add some corals that my feed on them in the future.
 

horseplay

NJRC Member
Pods multiple extremely fast in the right environment for them, i.e. a little dirty tank and a lot of hiding spots. Size of the tank matters a lot.

How long have you had the fish? I have always wanted one but read they're on the very hard to keep fish list.
 

DYIguy

NJRC Member
Pods multiple extremely fast in the right environment for them, i.e. a little dirty tank and a lot of hiding spots. Size of the tank matters a lot.

How long have you had the fish? I have always wanted one but read they're on the very hard to keep fish list.
Had it for about a week- the tank is about a month old- but everything came from another tank- bare bottom. had a slight dino outbreak - only 4 other fish in the tank ( 40b) 2 chromis, a pink damsel and a striped blenny and a few frags- it's eating and has moved from the corner- my only concern is the Chromis
 

DYIguy

NJRC Member
Good luck with the fish. The tank size is definitely big enough to sustain a population.
Thanks, some member has a pair of Rainfords ( geezer?)- one reason I looked into them- I'm not into big fish- prefer a tank with smaller / medium size fish and more corals- it is a beautiful fish- I have read where some have a bunch- I'll stick to one for now
 

DYIguy

NJRC Member
I just added 3,000+ pods to the tank- of course the chromis are eating any free floating/ swimming ones- the rainford is doing fine- still in his corner- the striped blenny ( house security ) checks in and keeps the chromis at bay-

On a curious other note I added a sharknosed goby to the 13 gal about 2 weeks ago- it would hang on the glass or perch on rock- today it started to clean out a place under the rock- spitting out sand like a watchman- I like it
 

DYIguy

NJRC Member
The rainford has moved from the back corner to the front/ right side - with a little help from the boss of the tank- the striped blenny keeps everyone in line and is now constantly picking at the substrate :D
 

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DYIguy

NJRC Member
Pods multiple extremely fast in the right environment for them, i.e. a little dirty tank and a lot of hiding spots. Size of the tank matters a lot.

How long have you had the fish? I have always wanted one but read they're on the very hard to keep fish list.
So now I've had the rainford for about a week- it's about an inch and a half. I can see why some say they are difficult- it's peaceful and would probably be harassed to death by some fish- it's mates are 2 chromis, a pink damsel and a striped blenny- some may say I'm nuts but the blenny acts like the sergeant of the tank ( it does have the stripes lol)- made sure the others left it alone while getting used to it's new surroundings-stayed in the corner for the first few days- now is out in the middle of the tank with the rest of the crew- and all get along ( or ignore it )- I found that it eats only pods, and although I know every tank has them I went and bought 3,000+ just to be sure. The rainford eats all the time , picking at rock, and picking up pieces of the substrate ( aragonite ) chewing and spitting it out. I think the difficulty with them are tankmates and competition for pods
 
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